Mental Health • Life Is About The Lives You’re Saving

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“You didn’t make your mistakes in pen.”

Don’t end your life short, or you’ll deprive the world of everything you have to offer.

You won’t be there to hold the door open for the fragile lady – overwhelmed with groceries. You won’t be there to smile across the subway to someone suffering Monday morning blues. You won’t tell your co-worker a joke you heard on the radio or send a contagious laugh through the coffee shop line.

Cause them tears from a punch line.
Not from their loss.

Give them smiles for your future.
Not from your memories.

Give them a hug to hold onto.
Not to remember.

Every time you feel misplaced and lost in a world where you don’t belong, remember that sometimes life is about the lives you’re saving when you don’t even think you can save your own.


This image was illustrated in collaboration with Lemon Chicken Por Favor

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Mental Health • Depression Is Happiness

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“Depression is not robotic. You can still express a genuine smile; you jut may cherish it more.”

Depression changes more than who you are. It changes the people around you.

Your supportive family panics.

They ask you to comfort their racing minds. They want to hear you say you’re fine and everything’s back to normal – even if they know it’s not.

Your friends don’t know you anymore.

They sigh when you pass on a night of drinking and like everyone else, they just want to pat you on the back and tell you it will blow over.

Your job is slipping from your control.

You can’t devote your hectic mind to 8 hours of concentration a day. You can’t accumulate enough vacation hours to sacrifice when the illness numbs your body and your bed holds you hostage.

You live your days in frustration and judgment.

You live misunderstood. And the days you don’t feel those feelings. The days your mind doesn’t strangle you – are the days you’re a shell. You don’t feel anything at all.

Depression is the inability to be who you are.

You want to be the one with the kind heart.

You want people to watch as you achieve big things and concur life flawlessly.

You want to wear a permanent smile and see the good in people’s eyes – not pity. It sounds so easy. Anyone could be happy if they let themselves. But it’s not that easy, and it takes losing simple happiness to understand it.

Depression is not suicidal.

It doesn’t paint purple bags beneath your eyes or leave your wrists scared with self-loath. There’s no rain cloud over your head or a mandatory all-black dress code. You don’t spend your days choking on tears with makeup stained cheeks.

Depression isn’t an Instagram caption, proclaiming sadness about a broken heel and it isn’t an opportunity to incorporate self-pity into casual conversation. Depression isn’t robotic. You can still express a genuine smile; you just may cherish it more.

Depression shows you the dark to remind you there’s light.

It knocks you down so you can learn how to stand. It opens your mind so you can survive the closed world and it makes you strong so you forget you were weak.

Depression is pushing against the wind that keeps pushing back. Its resistance hitting you cold in the face.

It’s reading your life on paper, the words resemble a script, telling the story of a character in a desirable life. It’s sitting by the water, a Caribbean drink in hand while your mood still sings like a twisted Beetles song. It’s as agonizing as a broken arm, threatening to restrict day-to-day movements.

Depression is happiness.

It’s not sadness. It’s intelligence. It’s wanting more from life. It’s wanting more from yourself. It’s wanting what you don’t have. It’s wanting what you don’t yet know.


This image was illustrated in collaboration with Lemon Chicken Por Favor

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Mental Health • The Solution Is The Noise

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“Even if your voice goes unheard – it doesn’t go unnoticed.”

Maybe a Facebook post can’t convince you beauty’s skin deep and maybe a stream of hashtags can’t save the world. Maybe a viral video can’t defeat disease and maybe awareness groups can’t change every mind. Maybe a single fundraiser can’t cure cancer and maybe a peaceful voice can’t really stop a war.

But maybe the solution is the noise that it makes.

The eyebrows it raises.

The questions it asks.

You don’t have to have the loudest voice or the deepest pockets to make a difference. You don’t have to be the smartest person in the room or have the most influential view. You simply have to be willing to be a part of a greater plan. You have to understand that even if your voice goes unheard – it doesn’t go unnoticed.


This image was illustrated in collaboration with Lemon Chicken Por Favor

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Mental Health • OCD Is The Fear Of Wrong

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“It’s an incredibly powerless feeling to lose control to your thoughts.”

OCD is the fear of wrong.

Wrong placement.
Wrong timing.
Wrong outcome.

It’s tidy chaos.
A disguised flaw.

OCD rituals allow your mind to manifest its disorganization and stress.

It’s subconsciously using physical items (the things you have the most control over) as an anchor for when the things in your mind – and the things in your life – go SO awry.

Whether it’s washing your hands, cleaning the kitchen, fiddling with a light switch, or doing tasks in tedious routine – having OCD takes up time.

Leaving you both emotionally and physically drained.

OCD is visual.

It loves to be seen, and heard, and felt, and acknowledged.

Accommodated.

Finding something to positively preoccupy your time will distract your thoughts and cause your OCD to wither away – due to lack of attention.

To have OCD is to consciously know that your actions are irrational.

You’re aware of what you’re doing, and that’s what makes the entire concept even more frustrating; because you STILL cannot stop. It’s an incredibly powerless feeling to lose control to your thoughts.

Remember. The more you surrender to your OCD and succumb to the fact that it doesn’t make sense – it WON’T make sense. This is your mind. No parent, no friend, no teacher, and no therapist can read your mind better than you.

Study your OCD.

Address it.

Find what makes it tick.

What triggers its explosion?

Learn what lets it be.

Learn to take back your thoughts.


This image was illustrated in collaboration with Lemon Chicken Por Favor

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Mental Health • They Care But They Don’t Understand

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“You’ve stopped embracing the warmth of fresh laundry. You’ve stopped savoring the last sip of your morning tea.”

They don’t understand.

They don’t understand why you’ve collapsed on the side of the road, sobbing hysterically into your hands. They don’t understand why their messages sit in your inbox, unacknowledged for days. They don’t understand why your mind wanders to dark places, despite their constant pleas to “cheer up”!

Don’t get it wrong, they care – but they don’t understand.

They don’t understand how you’ve lost respect for your life. How you can’t find anything to live for. You hold onto the familiar, aching to relive the simpler days.

They don’t understand how you’ve stopped dreaming.

You’ve stopped embracing the warmth of fresh laundry.

You’ve stopped savoring the last sip of your morning tea. You’ve stopped smiling at the innocent, young faces you see on the street.

You’ve stopped living,
and they don’t understand.


This image was illustrated in collaboration with Lemon Chicken Por Favor

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